Sarah Palin Recipes and Favorite Foods

 

OK…Sarah Palin didn’t write an entire cookbook, but she has a few delicious recipes out there, arising from her work in the commercial fishing business. I’m posting these for two reasons:

1. For anyone with the time, and wherewithal to organize fund-raisers to Gov. Palin…especially if you are doing one where she will actually be speaking, what’s a better way to drive the message home than with her creations?

2. To enlighten about another aspect of who Sarah Palin is.

If’ you’re going to spread these around, please, make sure that Sarah Palin gets credited. These are her recipies.

Without further adieu:

Sarah Palin’s Sweet and Saucy Grilled Salmon
http://welovefish.com/firstannual8.htm

1 can (12 oz.) tomato sauce
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup molases
3 tbsp. ketchup
2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
2 tbsp. dried minced onion
1 tbsp. Worcestershure sauce
1 tbsp. mustard
1 tbsp. dried bell pepper dices
1/4 tsp. each cinnamon and nutmeg
4 to 6 Alaska salmon fillets or steaks (4 to 6 oz. each)

Blend all ingredients, except seafood, in bowl; let set 10 to 15 minutes. Dip seafood into sauce, then place on hot oiled grill, not directly over heat source (coals or gas). Cover and vent. Cook about 6 to 12 minutes per inch of thickness, brushing with extra sauce, if desired. Do not overcook or burn edges.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Also great with Alaska halibut or cod!


This next one is Sarah Palin’s moose stew. Now, moose cannot be sold under Federal regs, so unless you or a friend go out and shoot one yourself, you’re out of luck for doing this…at least with moose. It might be possible to substitute venison (which is a lot easier to get) or equivalent cuts of beef — Sarah Palin would know best, but here it is…

Ragoût d’Orignaux alla Palin (Sarah Palin Moose Stew)
1 1/3 pounds top or bottom round of moose
1 1/3 pounds chuck or shoulder of moose
1 1/3 pound moose cheeks
1 moose foot, soaked and boned
1 piece pork rind
1/2 pound slab bacon
1/4 pound fatback
1/2 bunch parsley
4 carrots
3 onions
3 cloves garlic
1 celery heart
3 tomatoes
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 bouquet garni (thyme, bay leaf, parsley, savory)
Zest of 1 orange
1 tablespoon peppercorns
1 pinch allspice
Flour/Salt/Pepper
1 celery rib (For the Marinade)
1 onion
2 carrots
3 shallots
3 cloves garlic
1/2 bunch parsley
1 sprig savory
2 bay leaves
Zest of 1 orange
3 cups red wine, preferably Gigondas
6 tablespoons cognac
3 tablespoons olive oil

Ragoût is a method of cooking à l’étouffée, meaning slow cooking in a daubière, a pot with a cover designed to hold hot water. Traditionally placed in a hearth, the daubière heats from above and below in the oven.

Marinade:

The day before, cut the moose meat into large cubes and prepare the vegetables for the marinade. Trim and chop the celery, peel and chop the onion, carrots, and shallots. Peel the garlic. Place the moose meat in a large bowl with the chopped vegetables and whole garlic cloves. Add the parsley, savory, bay leaves, orange zest, wine, cognac, and oil. Let marinate, refrigerated, for 12 hours.

Cooking:

The next day, blanch the moose foot and the pork rind. Chop the slab bacon and fatback into 1 by 1/4-inch pieces, removing any rind. Chop the parsley finely and roll the fatback in it. Prepare the vegetables by peeling and finely chopping the carrots and onions. Peel and crush the garlic. Chop the celery heart. Peel, seed and quarter the tomatoes. Remove the moose meat from the marinade with a slotted spoon and drain it on paper towels. Strain the marinade through a fine sieve. Preheat the oven to 250° F. Heat the oil in a large skillet and sauté the moose meat over high heat until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper.

Place the pork rind in the bottom of a large Dutch oven or earthenware casserole. Spread about 1/3 of the moose meat over the rind. Add about 1/3 of the chopped vegetables, and sprinkle with some of the bacon, fatback, and diced moose foot. Continue to layer the ingredients in this manner until all are used. Add the bouquet garni; orange zest, peppercorns (tied in a square of cheesecloth) and the allspice. Add the strained marinade. Prepare a moist dough of flour and water, form it into a long cord and place it around the rim of the pan. Moisten the edge of the pan, cover with warm water and press it down firmly on the dough to form a seal. Place in the preheated oven and bake for 5 hours. Remove from the oven, break the flour crust and remove the cover. Turn the oven off, and return the daube to the oven to rest, uncovered, in the residual heat for 30 minutes longer. Serve with fresh pasta.


This one is not a Sarah Palin recipie, but she enjoys eating it out of waffle cones: MooseTracks® Ice Cream.

MooseTracks® IceCream — The Real McCoy
http://www.moosetracks.com/flavors/detail/12

Can’t get the real thing? Here’s how to fake it:

Get vanilla ice cream.
Mix with Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups (the little ones); or just mix it up with your favorite creamy peanut butter (Skippy, Jif, etc.).
Mix with solid fudge chunks

My own preference is:

ExtremeMooseTracks®
http://www.moosetracks.com/flavors/detail/14

Allergic to/don’t like peanut butter in your ice cream? Get the Extreme version listed above, which substitutes fudge cups for the peanut butter.

In New York City, the closest equivalent is a Ralph’s Famous Italian Ices ice cream flavor called Mississippi Mud (warning: once you eat it, you can’t stop!).

Update: Dolly Madison has the Original MooseTracks® flavor in New York City. Western Beef sells bricks of them.

MooseTracks® is a registered trademark of Denali Flavors, Inc.


Sarah Palin is also known to like the following food products:

  • Starbucks Mocha Lattes (hot, I don’t know about iced).
  • Diet Dr. Pepper

There is an organic red wine called Palin Syrah (the wine is pronounced, “pay-LEEN sih-rah”), which is imported from Chile. The wine has nothing to do with Sarah Palin and existed before her VP campaign, but has created quite the stir — especially among liberals who won’t drink it, because of the name. So….we — Sarah’s supporters — should make it a point to buy this wine and serve with our meat-based dishes. And at $13/bottle, it’s affordable.

http://northberkeleyimports.com/vintners/?id=132

Editor and Publisher, US for Palin; LAN Infrastructure PM; IFR PPL; fishing, shooting.

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